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Training / April 2019

Killing It With Kettlebells: 6 New Kettlebell Movements To Add To Your Next Workout

Reebok athlete and trainer Lindy Barber shows 6 ways you can get even more out of your kettlebell workout.

When it comes to kettlebells, there’s so much fitness to be gained. But many have only scratched the surface.
 
First invented in 18th century Russia by farmers to weigh crops and later by circus strongmen as a way to bulk up, kettlebells became a more mainstream piece of workout equipment in the 2000s.
 
While kettlebell swings (pictured below) are undoubtedly the most widely known movement performed with this piece of equipment, they’re far from the only movement you can use the weights for.
 
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“There are many movements, beyond the standard kettlebell swing, that can be done with one or two kettlebells,” says Reebok athlete and trainer Lindy Barber.
 
Below, Barber demonstrates six additional movements that will help you get even more out of the kettlebells already in your possession. So instead of just performing the standard swing—which you should certainly keep doing—consider also adding some or all of the below to your next workout. 
 
But remember: “Start with light kettlebells and only increase the weight once you have the proper technique,” Barber says.
 

Kettlebell deadlift

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With feet planted on the ground in line with your shoulders, there should be one kettlebell placed on either side. While keeping your back straight, careful not to hunch over, lift the weights off the ground until your arms reach full extension. Lower the weights back to the ground, then lift back up. 
 

Single arm deadlift 

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This movement takes the above to another level. With only one weight to your side and while keeping your back flat, lift the kettlebell up off the ground and your head forward while raising the same side leg behind you. Maintain balance is the key.  
 

Kettlebell push-up 

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This movement makes one of the most tride-and-true exercises — the push-up — even better, since it gives you a deficit on the regular push-up. Place the kettlebells just outside your shoulders. Grip the kettlebells while in the top of a plank position, slowly lower yourself below the handles, then push up again.
 

Kettlebell oblique dips

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A simple looking move with big results—hold one kettlebell to your side, then move your supporting shoulder downward to drop the weight slightly below your knee, then lift back up to starting position and do it again.
 

Kettlebell clean

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Start in a stance similar to how you started the deadlift – back flat, not hunched – but in this case, the kettlebell should be between your legs. Holding the kettlebell in one hand, thrust upward so the kettlebell reaches your shoulder and your legs reach full extension. 
 

Kettlebell push jerk

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With knees bent and while holding the weight close to your side bicep with the opposite arm outstretched for balance, push the kettlebell upwards over your head while slightly jumping. Lower the kettlebell so you return it to the starting position. 
 
Shop the shoes Barber is wearing.
Training / April 2019