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/ August 2019
Brittany Burke, Global Content

Camille Leblanc-Bazinet Gets Through Tough Workouts With A Little Help From Her Girls

It's all about your support system.

When you're gearing up for your toughest workouts—like your Frans, Cindys, and Lindas—it can feel like you're in it alone, even if you're working out with everyone at your box. After all, you're the only one in your head, feeling your pain, and listening to your body scream. Coming off of her first CrossFit Games competing as a team, Camille Leblanc-Bazinet has an interesting perspective on the difference between the solitary sport, and the team competition

"When pressure is high, emotions run high, and people can tend to really only focus on their own feelings," says Leblanc-Bazinet. "Our team did the opposite. All we wanted was for everyone to feel comfortable, because if you're comfortable, you're your best self, and then you can perform your best."

That camaraderie paid off on the field—Leblanc-Bazinet's team finished the competition second overall, which is no small feat. But the placement wasn't what Leblanc-Bazinet felt most proud of throughout the weekend.

"Our team became so much more together than teammates, and it was obvious that we were the team that was having the most fun," she says. "We became really good friends during the process, which is the biggest win."

Focusing on the friendships she's made over her decade-plus CrossFit career is not a new concept to Leblanc-Bazinet. In fact, she says it's something that has walls been important to her, and it name naturally after competing and working with so many women who had similar values and goals.

 “The first time I came to the CrossFit Games, I fell in love with the other women as competitors. I thought they were just so strong mentally and physically, and I was so impressed that I could be a part of that group,” she says. The difference between being a 20-year-old in that group and a 30-year-old in that group, though, is all about Leblanc-Bazinet’s confidence.

"I know who I am, and I just want to share the suffering, work, and experience with other girls, and keep learning and growing."

“When I was 20, I thought I had to act a certain way,” she says. “I’d see people walking with their chest puffed out, and say, ‘Oh, is this what confidence looks like? Do I have to walk like this?’ I was trying to figure out who I was. Now, I know who I am, and I just want to share the suffering, work, and experience with the other girls, and keep learning and growing.”

Leblanc-Bazinet prides herself on being a resource for other women to reach out to when they’re stressing about their training or feeling the pressure, and fosters her relationships with the women she competes with through texting them to let them know she’s thinking about them, or that she’s cheering them on. “I’m very real, and I don’t put a façade on like I’m so tough, and that’s what’s allowed me to have such deep connection with other athletes,” she says. “I text people out of the blue all the time if I’m thinking about them—I think that can really make someone’s day.

Ultimately, Leblanc-Bazinet says she would always rather be the person who is making sure people are having fun throughout the sport, and she’s always trying to make people laugh. She’s proof that even the fiercest competitors can have fun, and doing so can make the sport even more engaging. She’s also found that through not isolating herself, and searching for the community throughout the competition, she’s able to get even more out of it.

“I’m no longer in a place where I’m trying to compete with other people—I’m going to try to use them to be as good as possible. When you’re a professional athlete and you push so hard, it’s really hard to find people who can relate to that,” she says. “To be able to have a group of women who are so confident and work so hard and that don’t care if they have muscle—they embrace muscles and the way they look—it’s so hard to find that out there. Just by respecting each other in that way, we kind of all became best friends.”

Shop the CrossFit Nano, and The Girls pack here. 

/ August 2019
Brittany Burke, Global Content